Book Review: Murder in Baker Street ~ New Tales of Sherlock Holmes

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I don’t know about you, but I am a Sherlock Holmes fan to the max! I have read every Holmes story ever written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. I can honestly say I have read them many more times than just once. I have hardcover editions on my bookshelves. There are authors who have taken in hand the challenge to write where Conan Doyle left off. I am a purist and have shunned these copycats becuase no one can do Conan Doyle and Sherlock right. Be that as it may, I succumbed to a book entitled Murder in Baker Street.

The book is edited by 3 mystery writers and contains 11 original stories by modern day mystery writers, such as Anne Perry, Peter Tremayne, LB Greenwood, to name a few. I really have to confess that I found all of the tales to be true to character and very entertaining. I am sure they had to do a little bit of studying to get the characters to fill the mold made by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

“The Man from Capetown” by Stuart M. Kandinsky had me questioning how the story fit together. At the end all was made clear. Very clever.

“The Case of the Borderline Dandelions” involved a famous gentleman about to be hanged for murdering his ill-tempered shrew of a wife. Who can guess what dandelions had to do with the mystery?

“The Siren of Sennen Cove” brought sailors to their deaths and their ships sunken to the ocean floor. Sailors are superstitious but I bet they never expected to see a siren 12 feet tall. This is a very clever tale by Peter Tremayne. (In fact I am starting one of his novels today – Absolution of Murder. I’ll let you know how it is.)

Anne Perry contributed “The Case of the Bloodless Sock”. “The Adventure of the Anonymous Author” by Edward D. Which, and “The Case of the Vampire’s Mark” by Bill Crider are included. “The Adventure of the Arabian Knight” is by Loren D. Esteban. “The Adventure of the Cheshire Cheese” was rather unusual. The name is misleading. Jon L. Green wrote this one. “Darkest Gold” was written by LB Greenwood.

Dr. Watson always told the stories about Sherlock’s triumphs. My favorite story, “A Hansom for Mr. Holmes” by Gillian Linscott, was not told by Dr. Watson. The storyteller was the driver of a Hansom cab in this tale. It was delightful and I liked this story the best because of the way the commoner spoke. My second best favorite was entitled “The Remarkable Worm” by Carolyn Wheat.

I was really amazed at the quality of the stories. This was definitely a fun read that showed my hero at his wittiest. I could safely recommend this book to other Sherlocks. (And this is a real word in the Oxford English Dictionary. So there!)

The game is afoot! Happy Reading!

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